An Inventory of Classics

An Inventory of Classics

Supporting Guest Photography courtesy of www.eatsandsights.com |With the participation of @augustinaa (Instagram) 
 

The salon of “The Greatest Neighborhood Restaurant” exhibits an inventory of classics. Above a Davy’s Gray and Carolina Blue patterned settee hang five frames of abstract art evocative of Damien Hirst “spot paintings.” Metal Tolix chairs border a polished wood table aglow under the lights of burnished antique two-arm table lamps. An emerald velvet booth extends to an entryway, which reveals an Arcadian terrace that offers a generous cue of shade. This American brasserie, dubbed The Henry, exemplifies a Roaring (Twenties) sophistication.

A remarkable accomplishment is discovered in the duality of the culinary cues at The Henry. Where classical dinners are supplied in the evening, contemporary breakfasts are enjoyed in the noontime. In his book, American Food: The Gastronomic Story, Evan Jones, the late food writer famed for his efforts to bring the winning accents of American cuisine to the fore, references this mealtime character called brunch. He traces its culinary heritage to 1930s’ America. This dynamic that sees a harmony amid design and cuisine at The Henry is one that advances the restaurant as a space of fulfillment and gathering for family and friends.